Author Topic: Study your favorite artist's track using a Frequency Analyzer  (Read 1596 times)

alanisnotcool

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Study your favorite artist's track using a Frequency Analyzer
« on: January 28, 2017, 09:07:34 pm »
Does anyone else buy their favorite artist's track, open up their DAW, put a Parametric EQ on it and just watch where each instrument is taking up space and where its not and how it's all beautifully molded together?

I learn so much from doing that, way more than I thought I would.  Not only do I better understand the role of each instrument in the context of the song but it also teaches me things about how the human ear interprets sound, and it teaches me that in order to create the atmosphere or impact that I desire, I have to understand the role of each section of the frequency spectrum.  I have to let each sound have its own space and that requires cutting unwanted frequencies with confidence, and boosting others that are more desirable without having it overpower the song because having that big drop doesn't mean you have to boost all these frequencies. Things sound louder when they simply have more frequency space to "breathe"

Sorry some of this probably sounds like old news to most everyone here, and I actually "knew" this too before I started doing it.  I just wanted to know if anyone gets the same type of clarity about mixing when they do this, or if they do this.  Because if ya don't, then ya should!
« Last Edit: January 28, 2017, 09:39:39 pm by alanisnotcool »

Rixir

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Re: Study your favorite artist's track using a Frequency Analyzer
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2017, 12:06:57 am »
Yes I do this a lot! Another trick that I use constantly is opening a track in my DAW, loading up Fabfilter Pro-Q and removing the mid (mono) channel from the song by going into M/S mode and turning the output pan completely right. You can use Audacity for this too and you can do it with stock plugins like Fruity Stereo Shaper. Then it only leaves the side (stereo) signal and usually I'll notice a lot of elements that I wouldn't have noticed before. It also usually removes the vocal and drums (not all the time) so then you can hear certain elements a lot more clearly.

I really like using Divinity by Porter Robinson as an example: https://clyp.it/e02rjit2 There is this one sound that hits around the fourth beat of each measure that is a lot clearer with the mono signal removed (the effect is actually almost entirely stereo, you can barely hear it if you remove the side signal). You can also hear the firework-sounding effect that's pitching down a lot more clearly too.

I may be misunderstanding this technique or not using correct wording but I started using it months ago and it really helps me out!

vinceasot

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Re: Study your favorite artist's track using a Frequency Analyzer
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2017, 01:45:23 am »
study study study!

eidolon

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Re: Study your favorite artist's track using a Frequency Analyzer
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2017, 04:32:59 am »
i never noticed that about divinity rixir, that's really cool! i only just really started getting into using stereo manipulation and it's so helpful for getting things to fit right.

listening to music closely is always a really good idea, and in a certain sense i think bringing it into your DAW can make it more "real," you can start to visualize how it was made, even take it a step forward and try to remake it. sort of like transcribing & learning songs on an instrument to get better.
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