Author Topic: Having trouble starting or finishing your tracks? Use the 80/20 rule.  (Read 1748 times)

makrsamples

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Hey guys.

Here's an article I wrote explaining a few techniques that help with starting and finishing tracks.

I know a lot of people out there struggle with this. Even strong producers get this.

And it's because it's a problem associated with non-technical skills like time management and productivity.

I think as producers, we naturally gravitate toward technical knowledge without thinking about other aspects of production. But those other areas of knowledge are just as important.

This technique utilizes what's known as the 80/20 rule to provide a basic framework I use to focus on the most important parts of a production session. That way I don't suffer from decision paralysis and can make well-thought-out creative decisions.

Let me know if you find this useful!

alanisnotcool

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Re: Having trouble starting or finishing your tracks? Use the 80/20 rule.
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2016, 09:36:00 pm »
This is a great article!

Over the years I have always had this problem of finishing my tracks.  As a result, I've developed habits of checking myself and making sure that I'm working efficiently so I was pleased to see you mentioning the same habits and give even more.  I love how you present the information here, It's easy to follow and very applicable for me. I really needed to read this and remind myself about how important time-management is as well, and I really like your suggestion of thinking about your bedroom studio time as a studio session that is charging you by the hour to be there. So thank you!  :)

eidolon

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Re: Having trouble starting or finishing your tracks? Use the 80/20 rule.
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2016, 03:02:56 pm »
i definitely agree with a lot of this.

however, i'd also argue that the other 80% of input does definitely have it's value! for me, that's learning new things about theory, production, and collecting inspiration. while the actual songwriting process only takes up a short portion of your total time, there's a lot that goes into it behind those sessions.

also question for y'all: who is your article is targeted towards? at first it seemed more helpful for someone trying to "go pro" with their music, but now that i think about it i wish i'd had that discipline since day 1 haha anyway good article, thanks for sharing!
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Dr. Duce

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Re: Having trouble starting or finishing your tracks? Use the 80/20 rule.
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2016, 10:12:58 am »
This is a great post as i think many creatives have an innate struggle with staying focused on the task at hand and seeing things through to completion. Our minds often tend to wonder a lot especially when we get bogged down with the more mundane aspects of the process. The 80/20 has been part of my arsenal for getting things done for quite a while now and it definitely works. I have also found that using the Pomodoro Technique of working for set periods then taking short breaks really enhances my output. I downloaded a free pomodoro timer and set it to 30 minutes with 5 minute breaks. it is a bit annoying at first as you feel like you are messing up your workflow but that 5 minute break really injects something into you brain which in turn improves your overall results. It's definitely worth exploring if you find yourself hitting creative brickwalls.
Dr. Duce: Music Tech Lecturer, Producer/Engineer, Musician & Child of God
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Dr. Duce

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Re: Having trouble starting or finishing your tracks? Use the 80/20 rule.
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2016, 10:39:38 am »
Just one more thing. Frequent breaks are essential. We get so immersed in what we are doing we forget to rest and refuel our brains and therefore our creativity. I've spent many a wasted hour just sitting in front of the screen aimlessly banging away at the midi keyboard hoping that something would come out that would be useful only to end up deleting it all. What i should have been doing is moving to another completely different activity thereby refreshing my mind and stimulating productivity. Distraction is a great stimuli.
Dr. Duce: Music Tech Lecturer, Producer/Engineer, Musician & Child of God
www.ducebeats.com
www.musictechtraining.com