Author Topic: Panning, Stereo Separation/Enhancers, Reverb  (Read 2103 times)

Kenny Troy

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Panning, Stereo Separation/Enhancers, Reverb
« on: October 19, 2016, 07:31:22 pm »
Hey guys, so i've been playing around with the panning and stereo separation on one of my tracks for about two hours now and I'm still a little confused. Or maybe I just can't discern the sounds at a higher production level..

Four channels, two mixer slots

Layer One - fruity stereo enhancer 10% (basically all the way left), fruity side reverb w/ large hall & high diffusion and 50% separation on the reverb

1. Pluck Chord octaves 6th octave - pan 30% left, 60% channel volume
2. Pluck Chord octaves 5th octave - pan 40% right, 77% channel volume

same synth, same mixer track, different octaves

Lead Synth - fruity stereo enhancer 30% (left), fruity side reverb w/ small hall & small diffusion
1. Synth 5th octave - pan 100% left
1. Synth 5th octave - pan 100% right

same synth, same mixer track, same octave, only panned opposite.

What I was trying to accomplish was to increase the stereo field such that the the pluck synths would be far out on the side with a large reverb hall to increase stereo field usage, and then take my main saw/horn synth and have that blast somewhat more toward the middle.

Would I be offsetting/masking the hard panning of the lead synth by having the pluck chord play w/ a large reverb hall? I have tried to reverse the panning and stereo separation of both layers but it seems to sound worse. There's quite a few combinations of panning and stereo enhancer and reverb settings to try.. sometimes I don't trust my ears.

Working toward a Showtek Cannonball/Slow Down/ How We Do type of composition... not even close yet their processing is unreal :P

Thoughts, comments, tips, experiences with working on the stereo field usign pan/sep/reverb?

Would you like to hear the track?

« Last Edit: October 19, 2016, 07:55:50 pm by Kenny Troy »

Marrow Machines

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Re: Panning, Stereo Separation/Enhancers, Reverb
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2016, 08:16:01 pm »
Yea post an example of the layers in question.


after a quick search on the reverb you're using, it seems like you're just adding a bunch of shit to the sides in hopes of achieving some form of "width". What you're achieving is not that.



If you decided on what you want to be the farthest layer (with most width), then that needs to be your reference point; and set every thing based upon that maximum, lower than the reference point you decided on.

I also see some errors in your numerical reasoning, given the reverberation unit and function of the parameter on the effect in question.

You have less width, but more separation on the reverb for LAYER ONE. this is a large reverb unit

You have more width, with less reverberation for LAYER TWO. this is a small reverb setting

^^was gathered by your post.

Now, if i were to characterize the given settings of the reverberation unit, you seem to have accomplished the opposite of the specific sound characteristics of the settings.
IE, you are negating the natural tendency of the basis of the reverb settings you have chosen (large and small). and you might potentially have irked your innate intuition.

The rest is for your consideration.


Here's a few tips about stereo width:

You can subtract other things, to make things appear bigger by not subtracting as much, in relation to other subjects.

Decide your reference point in terms of stereo width.

components of the channel fader, effects, and busses need to be considered as their form of "mixing" in the entire process of mixing your song. (same applies to the input source, especially if you have a large control over what goes into the channel before it hits the MAIN MIXER).

Things with width tend to have less importance. Things in mono tend to be more important.


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Suddy34

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Re: Panning, Stereo Separation/Enhancers, Reverb
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2016, 09:25:10 am »
Digging into your eq's to create some space might work. If it really sounds terrible you might have to go back to your sound design. You could try side chaining your tracks that you want on the edges of your stereo field with your track you want in the middle to let that come through first and then adding some ambience to the outer edges.

Marrow Machines

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Re: Panning, Stereo Separation/Enhancers, Reverb
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2016, 12:53:31 pm »
Digging into your eq's to create some space might work. If it really sounds terrible you might have to go back to your sound design. You could try side chaining your tracks that you want on the edges of your stereo field with your track you want in the middle to let that come through first and then adding some ambience to the outer edges.

That doesn't create control, it just creates a tunnel to which a more mono sound can be heard as more mono (or as stereo as you make it)
Josh Huval: Honestly, the guys who are making good art are spending their time making it.