Author Topic: Compression on synths  (Read 5652 times)

Vidale

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Compression on synths
« on: September 17, 2016, 02:46:04 am »
I just don't get one thing. I've been watching a lot of videos of big producers doing a lot of compression on their synth leads and I just don't get why. The velocity in their midi info is the same so there's not a lot of dynamics in their melodies, but they always throw compressors In there.... WHYY???? To glue layers? to make it sound different?




manducator

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Re: Compression on synths
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2016, 10:58:16 am »
With attack and release, you can shape the sound. That's something you can't with volume sliders.

Synthpads are compressed heavily to keep them audible although they are in the background. Because you can 'even out' the sound of strings and pads.

I guess there are more examples but the things mentioned above are my experiences.

A compressor is a kind of volume automator but it works in milliseconds, something that is virtually impossible to do with automating sliders.

And yes, you can compressor several layers together to get a glued sound.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2016, 11:00:24 am by manducator »

vinceasot

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Re: Compression on synths
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2016, 04:44:20 am »
which big producers are you talking about? a lot of the big djs dont know how to make their tracks lol, they only know the surface of producing but not the mechanics

you see a lot of guys talk about their crazy eqing and compression but a lot of that isnt needed
compression is to add transient to the sound

RISE

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Re: Compression on synths
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2016, 04:59:18 am »
Don't negate the possibility they may not know what they are doing.

It depends on the synth dynamic and the intended application.

You can control the volume of the sound over time as the timbre changes. For example, a sound that starts out as a high frequency and then goes down to a low frequency may have a different amplitude throughout this change. Compression will bring these high volume parts down to the low volume parts, ultimately allowing you to have the sound at a steady volume throughout the mix. This maintains the focus of the track as your attention isn't suddenly drawn to a quiet section (or vice versa) in a bassline or synth part.

When you understand what a compressor does, you can apply this to any situation. Whether it be a drum, bass guitar, a supersaw or your uncle's foley collection. You'll be able to assess the situation and apply your own discretion.

Marrow Machines

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Re: Compression on synths
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2016, 08:41:39 pm »
i use a compressor as a dynamic reducer.

also glue groups of tracks.

i rarely use it to tonally shape a sound.


I also use a compressor to capitalize on transients.
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Axis

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Re: Compression on synths
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2016, 04:10:27 am »
By adding a compressor you can get that characteristic sharp attack that you hear in lots of released tracks.  Some compressors also add color.  And last but not least, you can bring up the release/reverb tails to get that typical pumping sound.  I'm not sure if everybody knows the details of how a compressor works, but you can just throw it in and see if it sounds better - most of the time it will (depending on the settings and on your style of music of course).

attila

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Re: Compression on synths
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2016, 08:11:17 pm »
I use it mostly because I'm lazy with sound design. If you compress a synth enough it sounds like you're exorcising the soul out of it which I like. Gives the session energy. Pushing the hell out of synths is a quick way to see if there's interesting potential in a basic sound too (is it interesting enough to carry a section without bloating with other layers).

Lydian

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Re: Compression on synths
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2016, 06:34:57 pm »
I use it on my drop layers usually to bring out the tail of the sound or to bring out the reverb.

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Re: Compression on synths
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2016, 01:14:18 pm »
You can even out the dynamics on a synthline, resulting in a fuller/fatter sound. That's of course just one example.

animals

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Re: Compression on synths
« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2016, 02:13:25 am »
A lot producers use multiband compression to push the bass frequencies up and make the sound fatter as well as using the compressor to eq the sound like give more presences to the highs cause a lot of synths dont have good highs. I think a lot of people say like lay off the compression but you can pretty hard with the compression and eqing on synths not so much drums and organic sounds but synths. As for the compressor its usually just to glue sounds athough eqing/sound design probably more important.

rmastering

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Re: Compression on synths
« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2016, 01:37:40 pm »
It always depends on the overall sound of your mix and how your synths cut through the other instruments. Personally i wouldn't compress too much. Use the attack, release and threshold to adjust your compressor and rely on your ears.

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Re: Compression on synths
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2016, 05:23:29 pm »
Don't negate the possibility they may not know what they are doing.

It depends on the synth dynamic and the intended application.

You can control the volume of the sound over time as the timbre changes. For example, a sound that starts out as a high frequency and then goes down to a low frequency may have a different amplitude throughout this change. Compression will bring these high volume parts down to the low volume parts, ultimately allowing you to have the sound at a steady volume throughout the mix. This maintains the focus of the track as your attention isn't suddenly drawn to a quiet section (or vice versa) in a bassline or synth part.

When you understand what a compressor does, you can apply this to any situation. Whether it be a drum, bass guitar, a supersaw or your uncle's foley collection. You'll be able to assess the situation and apply your own discretion.

Me - "I compress my Boss everyday" lmao … Na, but really - 90% of these cats sharing tips don't know what they're talking about - Their mix goes to OTHER engineers who shape up the sound the label wants lol … The industry is funny. But yeah - I mainly use compression on drums, and every once in a while if I have a synth that changes dramatically but aside from that I stay away from compression. I am however about to compress these dishes into my dishwasher lmao ..
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