Author Topic: question about dynamic range  (Read 1986 times)

R3Mington

  • Sub Bass
  • *
  • Posts: 58
  • Honor: 0
  • wtf is music theory?
    • View Profile
question about dynamic range
« on: August 19, 2016, 09:49:02 pm »
question about dynamic range.

basically as edm producers we are EQing and compressing synths,instruments or samples to be condensed to a certain section of the spectrum / dynamic range.

what are the best ways to handle this and fill certain spectrum's with certain frequencies or instruments?
is it a general consensus that a song should cover an entire spectrum in relation to human hearing (i forgot what the actual theory is called - i.e cutting lower sub frequencies because it muddies the mix and vice versa top)

thanks for the comments and help

Marrow Machines

  • Mid
  • ***
  • Posts: 788
  • Honor: 101
  • Electronic Music
    • marrow-machines
    • MarrowMachines
    • View Profile
Re: question about dynamic range
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2016, 10:18:39 pm »
You're reference point is the key of the song that you're in.

Given that, there's frequencies that are associated with the key of the song that you need to be aware of to best make use of an EQ.

Look up a frequency chart of orchestra instruments and then replicate that with synthesizers.

I don't see why you'd want to fill up the the song with just a ton of crap that probably will make the mixing more complicated.


Sounds like you should be focusing on the sound source before you start worrying about mixing. Treatment and source selection really make or break the modern sound or creates the sound you're looking for.

I am starting to believe that, sample packs are designed specifically to have that modern loudness already involved in the song, and the master just accentuates certain aspects about the mix.
Josh Huval: Honestly, the guys who are making good art are spending their time making it.

R3Mington

  • Sub Bass
  • *
  • Posts: 58
  • Honor: 0
  • wtf is music theory?
    • View Profile
Re: question about dynamic range
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2016, 10:27:30 pm »
You're reference point is the key of the song that you're in.

Given that, there's frequencies that are associated with the key of the song that you need to be aware of to best make use of an EQ.

Look up a frequency chart of orchestra instruments and then replicate that with synthesizers.

I don't see why you'd want to fill up the the song with just a ton of crap that probably will make the mixing more complicated.


Sounds like you should be focusing on the sound source before you start worrying about mixing. Treatment and source selection really make or break the modern sound or creates the sound you're looking for.

I am starting to believe that, sample packs are designed specifically to have that modern loudness already involved in the song, and the master just accentuates certain aspects about the mix.

ok so if im following you correctly a key of a song i.e A minor - would have the range of 240hz - whatever as an example and that would best be filled with synths and instruments that fill that sector in relation to less is more (you dont want to just fill it up if you dont have to)

where would i find a chart like that? i guess i dont really understand where you would get that type of information

thanks

Marrow Machines

  • Mid
  • ***
  • Posts: 788
  • Honor: 101
  • Electronic Music
    • marrow-machines
    • MarrowMachines
    • View Profile
Re: question about dynamic range
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2016, 10:40:24 pm »
ok so if im following you correctly a key of a song i.e A minor - would have the range of 240hz - whatever as an example and that would best be filled with synths and instruments that fill that sector in relation to less is more (you dont want to just fill it up if you dont have to)

where would i find a chart like that? i guess i dont really understand where you would get that type of information

thanks

There's frequency component to the key, and the instrument range.

I was speaking about an instrument frequency chart, that shows you the range at which the instrument is played at on a maximum and minimum value.


And if you know any thing about frequency content surrounding just one note, you'll be wise to consider that there's many other harmonics that help create the note.


You use graphs, math, and physics to understand the stuff. But you can get to an ok point with out those things, but if you push any more you're going to have to venture off into that realm.

« Last Edit: August 19, 2016, 10:47:29 pm by Marrow Machines »
Josh Huval: Honestly, the guys who are making good art are spending their time making it.

attila

  • Sub Bass
  • *
  • Posts: 118
  • Honor: 28
    • lyonnmusic
    • lyonntweets
    • View Profile
    • My band
Re: question about dynamic range
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2016, 11:28:16 pm »
Don't overthink it too much, you'll drive yourself crazy. Think of all of the amazing, full mixes that were created with just guitars, drums, bass and vocals. Music isn't a game of Tetris, don't feel obligated to fill every frequency band. Note which frequencies speak most to what the track is and make sure those are rock solid, then just strike a balance. There's no blueprint to making a song sound right, but there are plenty of unconventional, counter intuitive mixes that sound great.

Marrow Machines

  • Mid
  • ***
  • Posts: 788
  • Honor: 101
  • Electronic Music
    • marrow-machines
    • MarrowMachines
    • View Profile
Re: question about dynamic range
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2016, 04:56:24 pm »
Don't overthink it too much, you'll drive yourself crazy. Think of all of the amazing, full mixes that were created with just guitars, drums, bass and vocals. Music isn't a game of Tetris, don't feel obligated to fill every frequency band. Note which frequencies speak most to what the track is and make sure those are rock solid, then just strike a balance. There's no blueprint to making a song sound right, but there are plenty of unconventional, counter intuitive mixes that sound great.


Thanks for explaining things this way.

This is the consideration, and ultimate goal that OP should get when studying.


There's a certain amount of overlap to instruments, in a way, that you cannot remove every little bit of what you don't want. It's some times best to leave a little bit of the undesirable parts there, because it still makes up the sound. It will balance itself out with other components that do take up that range.


One simple advice that i got from a noisia video is that "it's there, although it maybe almost non existent, the sound is still there."



Consider things as a blend of EQ and compression(individually, mixing groups, mixing song). Know how much range allowed to be, as it influences the overall picture of your mix.
Josh Huval: Honestly, the guys who are making good art are spending their time making it.

R3Mington

  • Sub Bass
  • *
  • Posts: 58
  • Honor: 0
  • wtf is music theory?
    • View Profile
Re: question about dynamic range
« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2016, 09:09:31 pm »
thank you