Author Topic: How do you pick your melodic synth in relation to your bassline?  (Read 2549 times)

R3Mington

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Ok you have successfully synthesized a bassline and its fire...

how do you pick a melodic sound / chord sounds based off that?

do you re synthesize the sound so its basically the same sound as the bassline with slightly different qualities so it sounds concise?

thank you.

manducator

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Re: How do you pick your melodic synth in relation to your bassline?
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2016, 09:43:11 pm »
Time to learn some music theory, I guess.

https://www.musictheory.net/

R3Mington

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Re: How do you pick your melodic synth in relation to your bassline?
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2016, 12:20:54 am »
i know how to make it sound well with my music theory. thats not what im asking bud

Lydian

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Re: How do you pick your melodic synth in relation to your bassline?
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2016, 07:55:32 am »
Try doing things the opposite. Instead of how do you choose your melodic synth relative to your bassline the question can be how do you choose your bassline relative to your melodic synth?

The reason why I say that is because I choose my bassline AFTER I write my melodic material. The way I choose my bassline is simple cause the majority of the time it's just a simple sine wave and note wise it just follows the root note of the harmony.

I divide my bass layers like this.

1. Subbass. (Sine Wave)
2. Bass (Sine wave)
3. Upper Bass (anything)

The reason why I use a sine wave for my two bottom layers is because for the most part every sound wave below 200hz pretty much sounds the same when you filter out all the high end. The upper bass is where all the variation comes from. Basically to me it's the high end of a bass sound (200hz+) that gives it a unique characteristic. Everything else below that just sounds the same.

Quote
how do you pick a melodic sound / chord sounds based off that?

I don't usually write my bassline first but if I were to do so then the answer would just be experimentation. There are so many different combinations of instrumentations that you can use. (Cello, Piano, Guitar) for example or (saw pluck, detuned square pad, sine bass). For the most part the two bottom layers of a bass sound (below 200hz) blend well with just about anything. Start with just using those two layers to fill out the low frequencies and then choose your lead sounds. Once you got things sounding nice then maybe you can go back and experiment with the upper bass layer.

Quote
do you re synthesize the sound so its basically the same sound as the bassline with slightly different qualities so it sounds concise?

Sometimes I do actually. When you use the same sound but in a higher octave register it's almost like it comes from the same instrument family  because they share the same characteristics. (Cellos to Violins) Naturally things blend pretty well.

I wouldn't get too stuck on that though cause you don't need to use the same sound in the bass as you do in the leads. Anything goes. Just experiment with different instrumentations until you find a combination that you really dig and make it part of your signature style. Pretty soon people will be on youtube with HOWTO videos in massive on how to make a "r3mington lead stab"
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James Sweeney

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Re: How do you pick your melodic synth in relation to your bassline?
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2016, 04:22:00 pm »
honestly, it's all down to creative choice... if there were rules for this then all music would sound the same as everyone would be choosing the same sounds

Marrow Machines

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Re: How do you pick your melodic synth in relation to your bassline?
« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2016, 08:56:53 pm »
pick an octave reference point and start making designing a sound based on that area.

if it sounds good in that range, then you're good to go.
Josh Huval: Honestly, the guys who are making good art are spending their time making it.

R3Mington

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Re: How do you pick your melodic synth in relation to your bassline?
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2016, 03:00:01 pm »
Try doing things the opposite. Instead of how do you choose your melodic synth relative to your bassline the question can be how do you choose your bassline relative to your melodic synth?

The reason why I say that is because I choose my bassline AFTER I write my melodic material. The way I choose my bassline is simple cause the majority of the time it's just a simple sine wave and note wise it just follows the root note of the harmony.

I divide my bass layers like this.

1. Subbass. (Sine Wave)
2. Bass (Sine wave)
3. Upper Bass (anything)

The reason why I use a sine wave for my two bottom layers is because for the most part every sound wave below 200hz pretty much sounds the same when you filter out all the high end. The upper bass is where all the variation comes from. Basically to me it's the high end of a bass sound (200hz+) that gives it a unique characteristic. Everything else below that just sounds the same.

Quote
how do you pick a melodic sound / chord sounds based off that?

I don't usually write my bassline first but if I were to do so then the answer would just be experimentation. There are so many different combinations of instrumentations that you can use. (Cello, Piano, Guitar) for example or (saw pluck, detuned square pad, sine bass). For the most part the two bottom layers of a bass sound (below 200hz) blend well with just about anything. Start with just using those two layers to fill out the low frequencies and then choose your lead sounds. Once you got things sounding nice then maybe you can go back and experiment with the upper bass layer.

Quote
do you re synthesize the sound so its basically the same sound as the bassline with slightly different qualities so it sounds concise?

Sometimes I do actually. When you use the same sound but in a higher octave register it's almost like it comes from the same instrument family  because they share the same characteristics. (Cellos to Violins) Naturally things blend pretty well.

I wouldn't get too stuck on that though cause you don't need to use the same sound in the bass as you do in the leads. Anything goes. Just experiment with different instrumentations until you find a combination that you really dig and make it part of your signature style. Pretty soon people will be on youtube with HOWTO videos in massive on how to make a "r3mington lead stab"

so youre saying you have 3 bass synths playing at a time though? why is this.

I know this wasn't the original question but I understood your answer but of course that brought this question up

thanks

Marrow Machines

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Re: How do you pick your melodic synth in relation to your bassline?
« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2016, 09:13:09 pm »

so youre saying you have 3 bass synths playing at a time though? why is this.

I know this wasn't the original question but I understood your answer but of course that brought this question up

thanks

Sub bass and audible bass reside as one in one particular bass patch.

If you separate the sub bass from the audible bass layer, you will have more control over your mix entirely.

the other option is to have a sub bass layer in the patch that your audible bass is (but some times combining things at the wrong level ends up with a less than desired result).

The bass can be chopped up into how ever many layers you want. this also applies to lead synths, drums, and what ever else you might want to use or create at a micro or macro level.

I don't usually separate things based on frequency range, but i understand where the meat of my frequency content ought to be with the different sections and components of my mix (drums, bass, leads, sound effects).

that being said, if you do end up separating your individual components into different frequency ranges, you can process each layer a little different that will ultimately give you a different characteristic of texture and tone on a more detailed level than if you were to just slap on a distortion unit on your bass.

But you gotta decided what you want to do and how you want your stuff to sound like...Consider both tools and use them accordingly.
Josh Huval: Honestly, the guys who are making good art are spending their time making it.