Author Topic: How to choose the BPM?  (Read 3527 times)

from nowhere

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How to choose the BPM?
« on: June 13, 2016, 01:37:16 am »
I had a future bass project in 128bpm, the style and structure is of course FB but, how the bpm affect to a song, I mean,
If you start a glitch hop song in 140, it matters?
Why bpm (in production) is so important? How to choose the bpm?

Thanks for replies  ;D ;D :D

Marrow Machines

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Re: How to choose the BPM?
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2016, 06:10:53 am »
60-80BPM is down tempo, 80-120BPM is mid tempo, 120+BPM is uptempo.

that characterizes the genres and sets being played through out festivals.

that's from a friend's analysis.

they all have different feels and carry different energy.

choose what feels right to you.


i prefer things under 100 bpm. i stick with 70-95BPM specifically. those things feel the best to compose and write to at the moment.
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Scribit

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Re: How to choose the BPM?
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2016, 05:41:36 pm »
60-80BPM is down tempo, 80-120BPM is mid tempo, 120+BPM is uptempo.

that characterizes the genres and sets being played through out festivals.

Not necessarily. First thing is that some songs are half-step. So they are technically 140BPM, but the beat being half time makes it sound 70BPM.

Furthermore, the vibe and groove of some songs can make them feel faster or slower than they are. I usually find, but not always, that songs with quick rhythms have a faster feel to them then songs with slower rhythms. This means they can feel down tempo COMPARED to other songs being listened/played/DJed around them. It really is a case by case basis for whether something is down tempo, mid tempo or up tempo.
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DVTSUN

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Re: How to choose the BPM?
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2016, 10:00:02 pm »
Quote
How to choose the bpm?

Finding the exact BPM that your track will sound best at can get a bit tricky. Try the following:

1. Quick google search the bpm for your genre (if they give you a range, for instance for DnB it's 160-180, try picking 170 since it sits in the middle).
2. From there, start developing your track. The further your track comes along, the more clear it should become whether it is too fast or too slow. Then you can start fine-tuning your BPM. This becomes much easier when there are vocals involved because the vocals often dictates how fast or slow your track can be. If the BPM goes out of the range of the vocal, the song will start to sound extremely unnatural.
3. Once your track is more developed, you should send your track to an experienced friend that produces, DJs, or who is well-versed with music in general. They can quickly tell you whether it is slightly too fast or too slow. What happens a lot of the times is we grow too accustomed to the way the track sounds because we've listened to our own song hundreds of times. Getting a fresh perspective can help you correct your track by 2 or 3 BPM, which may make all the difference in the presentation your track.

Hope this helps :)
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Marrow Machines

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Re: How to choose the BPM?
« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2016, 12:10:08 am »
60-80BPM is down tempo, 80-120BPM is mid tempo, 120+BPM is uptempo.

that characterizes the genres and sets being played through out festivals.

Not necessarily. First thing is that some songs are half-step. So they are technically 140BPM, but the beat being half time makes it sound 70BPM.

Any one can move double or half the speed when dancing, so the feeling is different on an individual basis.

Dividing and multiplying helps, but you can't knock the fact that you are locked into the rate of change over time (unless you change it).

that rate of time that occurs naturally at slower tempos, help provide a different effect than songs at faster tempos.

Just because it feels like it's slower, doesn't mean it is slower.

style and sound characteristics dictate the ultimate genre of the song, and it's not strictly based on bpm.

considering the value placement, it can help guide people in a direction based on the magnitude of the BPM and the energy equivalent (with out augmentation but good to consider)
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