Author Topic: Music theory tutorials?  (Read 2815 times)

EliteRezk

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Music theory tutorials?
« on: March 23, 2016, 07:14:13 am »
Hey all, I've been trying to learn and wrap my head about some music theory stuff (Bought the Hook Theory E book and such)
I seem to be getting confused on chords and such, in the sense that if i was to draw the whole C major scale in my daw, id use it such as
C(1), E(3), G(5), And then id just change it from say D chord to D(1), F(3) A(5), is there any issue doing that?
And i was also  wondering what your favorite tutorials or videos on these are?
« Last Edit: March 23, 2016, 07:25:54 am by EliteRezk »

Mussar

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Re: Music theory tutorials?
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2016, 12:39:47 pm »
To be honest, this is why I don't like learning music theory from youtube tutorials and stuff like that. They give you a lot of rules that you're expected to follow without properly telling you why, and people develop an expectation that the rules are concrete and permanent and/or learn information that only makes sense when you learn fundamental concepts that get glossed over.

You can use any note and any chord in any scale, because almost every scale has the potential to play every single note, you just have to change the accidental. C Major contains every natural note (white keys on the piano), so the D chord you're referring to - D Natural Minor - would be called a diatonic chord - it only uses notes that are found within the scale. However, there's nothing saying that you can't use D major (D F# A) or D Diminished (D F Ab), for example, if you think it'll sound good.

I recommend everyone go to musictheory.net and spend a few days really going through the lessons one by one and trying to digest the information in sequence. If you can learn to read sheet music, comprehending theory gets so much easier.

EliteRezk

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Re: Music theory tutorials?
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2016, 02:36:24 pm »
To be honest, this is why I don't like learning music theory from youtube tutorials and stuff like that. They give you a lot of rules that you're expected to follow without properly telling you why, and people develop an expectation that the rules are concrete and permanent and/or learn information that only makes sense when you learn fundamental concepts that get glossed over.

You can use any note and any chord in any scale, because almost every scale has the potential to play every single note, you just have to change the accidental. C Major contains every natural note (white keys on the piano), so the D chord you're referring to - D Natural Minor - would be called a diatonic chord - it only uses notes that are found within the scale. However, there's nothing saying that you can't use D major (D F# A) or D Diminished (D F Ab), for example, if you think it'll sound good.

I recommend everyone go to musictheory.net and spend a few days really going through the lessons one by one and trying to digest the information in sequence. If you can learn to read sheet music, comprehending theory gets so much easier.

I lurk around alot but i see you post often everything you say has been amazingly helpful and respectful. i shall do exactly as you said, learning theory from videos and stuff is hard because of the exact reasons and if you get confused, or take something the wrong way IMO you can develop bad habits. as you said i shall spend the time i do on production daily into learning theory far better and understanding As its a extremely fundamental part of making songs and i do want to learn how to play the piano thus sheet music would be wonderful to learn. thank you for the link.

manducator

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Re: Music theory tutorials?
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2016, 03:28:40 pm »
musictheory.net is great. I wanted to recommend it to you but Mussar beat me. :p

And check this out:

http://www.oldschooldaw.com/manuals/MusicTheoryForComputerMusic.pdf

and this:

https://www.udemy.com/music-theory-classes/
« Last Edit: March 23, 2016, 03:31:06 pm by manducator »

Mussar

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Re: Music theory tutorials?
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2016, 03:46:06 pm »
It's important to pick a structured curriculum - not some sort of "crash course" self-teaching book or cheat sheet - and follow it. There are tons of resources available from udemy or khan academy to just finding a local piano teacher that can also teach you theory or enrolling in a community college course. Theory contains a lot of subjects within it, and you can get really overwhelmed if you do not know which order to learn them in. Then having to deal with the sorts of logical conclusions that everyone incorrectly makes, and the very very tricky world of enharmonics (Can you tell me what notes are in the F Diminished chord without using your piano roll? Then can you find them on the piano roll?)... It's just helpful to have a resource (and if you can get a teacher, even better).

EliteRezk

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Re: Music theory tutorials?
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2016, 04:53:26 pm »
It's important to pick a structured curriculum - not some sort of "crash course" self-teaching book or cheat sheet - and follow it. There are tons of resources available from udemy or khan academy to just finding a local piano teacher that can also teach you theory or enrolling in a community college course. Theory contains a lot of subjects within it, and you can get really overwhelmed if you do not know which order to learn them in. Then having to deal with the sorts of logical conclusions that everyone incorrectly makes, and the very very tricky world of enharmonics (Can you tell me what notes are in the F Diminished chord without using your piano roll? Then can you find them on the piano roll?)... It's just helpful to have a resource (and if you can get a teacher, even better).

Ive just booked for term two in to piano lessons near my area (two weeks till start), Would you say its ok to do some udemy courses like linked above while i wait? :) Or just wait till i actually begin?

Mussar

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Re: Music theory tutorials?
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2016, 04:56:26 pm »
It can't hurt!

FarleyCZ

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Re: Music theory tutorials?
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2016, 06:37:46 pm »
I think the glitch is that you want to read or watch it somewhere and then use it right away. Imho I'd do this:

1 - Buy at least 4 octave midi keyboard, if you don't have already. They're not too expansive.
2 - Load any listenable piano plugin.
3 - Slap a long reverb on it (like 30% w/d) so you'll enjoy it a bit more.
4 - Try what sounds good and what not. Combinations of notes. Pressed at once, then pressed after each other. Little melodies will appear that you can enjoy and try to develop. Trial and error will show you what works and what not.
5 - Cross reference those "rules" you've found with those books/videos you try to digest right now. You'll find out that you've discovered different intervals, chords and scales all by yourself. That book will name it for you.
6 - Try to keep this as a good time, not as a mandatory unpleasant learning experience. :)
"Earth is round right? Look at it from right angle and you'll be always on top of the world."
...but don't overdo it, because that's called being a d***k.