Author Topic: Thick Plucky Trance Lead  (Read 2439 times)

AB69

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Thick Plucky Trance Lead
« on: April 06, 2016, 09:12:29 am »
Looking for help creating a modern thick plucky trance lead.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StXLJJh2E18
Starts at 1:47

Am struggling to make it sound thick, quick, yet like a lead. My leads seem to sound too "sawwy", not as thick or in your face.

Would like to know how many layers is needed. Right now for my leads I usually work with 5, 1 in the center, 2 panned harder r/l, and 2 panned slightly r/l, but I keep hearing how less is more.

I also like to know if there is any delay or reverb automation? Sometimes when the lead opens up it sounds like there is more delay as well or could it just be the filter opening?

I am also interested in knowing, when the lead goes from plucky to open filter, is this better achieved by automating the lead to go from plucky to open filter or better to have the first lead come in plucky then 8 bars later have some open saw lead layers accompany the first plucky lead? I hope I explained that right.

I also own most of the main synths like Sylenth, Serum, Zebra, Spire. I just can't seem to achieve that thickness with the saw sound. I can adjust the ADSR to make it more plucky but it still lacks the thickness in the initial attack.

Edit: I seem to notice that if I leave the compressor on in the synths it is much more thicker and pluckier, but I always thought it was best to take off the in synth compressor and use a compressor on the master bus?

Would a compressor on the bus plus the in synth compressor be too much or is it a case where the in synth compressor doesn't actually compress all that much (i've heard this about Sylenth)?
« Last Edit: April 06, 2016, 10:17:59 am by AB69 »

vinceasot

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Re: Thick Plucky Trance Lead
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2016, 10:23:30 am »
look at the presets man and try and study them, theres lots of trance lead presets

and i think you should focus sound design on 1 synth at the moment and move on when you get better

Slizz

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Re: Thick Plucky Trance Lead
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2016, 03:30:22 pm »
severely detune a combination of saw and square waves, and give them fast attack so they don't ring. squares fill out the areas where saws are lacking and vice versa. layer these with a very subtle sine wave that has a low pass on it to give it thickness in the bottom end. the most important part is having a white noise oscillator that has extremely fast attack playing with the instrument which is where you get the snap from. don't over do it.

as far as filtering goes, build the patch in 1 VST (sylenth, massive, fm8, etc) and run all the oscillators through a low pass filter that has an attack envelope with sustain ("level" in decay section if you're using massive) mapped to a macro. When closed all the way, the filter will decay and close the sound so it has the fast attack that it needs, and you can just modulate this to open up which will cause less frequencies to be filtered out and give you more sustain. You won't even need to adjust your midi notes.

expert level - map the "level" in the attack section to another macro and modulate this to filter out high end from the transient if you want the pluckiness to remain in tact but have a building effect without using an external filter.

bryan

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Re: Thick Plucky Trance Lead
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2016, 07:59:45 pm »
severely detune a combination of saw and square waves, and give them fast attack so they don't ring. squares fill out the areas where saws are lacking and vice versa. layer these with a very subtle sine wave that has a low pass on it to give it thickness in the bottom end. the most important part is having a white noise oscillator that has extremely fast attack playing with the instrument which is where you get the snap from. don't over do it.

as far as filtering goes, build the patch in 1 VST (sylenth, massive, fm8, etc) and run all the oscillators through a low pass filter that has an attack envelope with sustain ("level" in decay section if you're using massive) mapped to a macro. When closed all the way, the filter will decay and close the sound so it has the fast attack that it needs, and you can just modulate this to open up which will cause less frequencies to be filtered out and give you more sustain. You won't even need to adjust your midi notes.

expert level - map the "level" in the attack section to another macro and modulate this to filter out high end from the transient if you want the pluckiness to remain in tact but have a building effect without using an external filter.

Slizz - can I just say that every single post you've made thus far has been really insightful and excellent? It's much appreciated, mate.  Thanks for sharing your knowledge.