Author Topic: Country/folk progressive house.  (Read 4216 times)

elixir

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Country/folk progressive house.
« on: March 02, 2016, 01:58:12 pm »
I see a nice little niche. An example, http://youtu.be/6Cp6mKbRTQY oldish song. I wonder why this didn't catch on?

Arktopolis

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Re: Country/folk progressive house.
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2016, 02:41:41 pm »
This genre emerges from Sweden every couple of decades: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VcDy8HEg1QY

Marrow Machines

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Re: Country/folk progressive house.
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2016, 04:03:33 pm »
I think the genres could maybe blend, but not in the pop form...

Most definitely cringe worthy.
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Joseph

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Re: Country/folk progressive house.
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2016, 06:08:01 pm »
"Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal."
-Picasso

"The reason we struggle with insecurity is because we compare our behind-the-scenes with everyone else’s highlight reel."
-Steve Furtick

Marrow Machines

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Re: Country/folk progressive house.
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2016, 09:02:49 pm »
https://youtu.be/oQR7J-6Oh14?list=LL40ippYdMc1ZtZejEpTiJpQ

It's not meant for everyone

I get that, but it's not a good cross over. Maybe if you so happen to have a bias towards modern pop and country.

It's a little bastardizing to people who do real folk music from all around the world.

If you're not authentic in the pursuit then I think it's best to be left alone.

But what ever, people gonna people...


*edit* that mix tape browse through seems to be fairly tasteful.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2016, 09:56:59 pm by Marrow Machines »
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Wontolla

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Re: Country/folk progressive house.
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2016, 12:28:42 am »
There's a difference between making a clever new fusion, and adding "spice". I don't make "oriental symphonic dubstep", after all. And nothing's wrong with that.

Marrow Machines

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Re: Country/folk progressive house.
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2016, 01:52:13 am »
There's a difference between making a clever new fusion, and adding "spice". I don't make "oriental symphonic dubstep", after all. And nothing's wrong with that.

I love throwing in ethnic/exotic instruments, but only if it's still with in the confines of the sound i am after.

I make sure to listen to the instruments in it's proper context before I try to throw it in there, a certain amount of respect must be paid in order to use it well.

*edit* most pop music now a days literally sounds the same and can be used for just about any thing it seems like.

It's tough to discern authenticity and a genuine pursuit of the sound you're after. Folk music came from people's lives and their way of life.  Businesses want to put a friggin price tag on it and make it accessible for consumption.

There's life in old music, it's tough to see life in the new pop music. The hardship of the individual isn't that much different even though times have changed.

But like i said, people gonna people.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2016, 01:57:35 am by Marrow Machines »
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Joseph

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Re: Country/folk progressive house.
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2016, 06:19:21 am »
https://youtu.be/oQR7J-6Oh14?list=LL40ippYdMc1ZtZejEpTiJpQ

It's not meant for everyone

I get that, but it's not a good cross over. Maybe if you so happen to have a bias towards modern pop and country.

It's a little bastardizing to people who do real folk music from all around the world.

If you're not authentic in the pursuit then I think it's best to be left alone.

But what ever, people gonna people...


*edit* that mix tape browse through seems to be fairly tasteful.

but that's your opinion...
There are songs we think are good and songs we think are bad, crossover or not it doesn't really matter...
"Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal."
-Picasso

"The reason we struggle with insecurity is because we compare our behind-the-scenes with everyone else’s highlight reel."
-Steve Furtick

Marrow Machines

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Re: Country/folk progressive house.
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2016, 02:02:36 pm »
https://youtu.be/oQR7J-6Oh14?list=LL40ippYdMc1ZtZejEpTiJpQ

It's not meant for everyone

I get that, but it's not a good cross over. Maybe if you so happen to have a bias towards modern pop and country.

It's a little bastardizing to people who do real folk music from all around the world.

If you're not authentic in the pursuit then I think it's best to be left alone.

But what ever, people gonna people...


*edit* that mix tape browse through seems to be fairly tasteful.

but that's your opinion...
There are songs we think are good and songs we think are bad, crossover or not it doesn't really matter...

Not when you're involving other culture in which you have absolutely zero involvement with or knowledge about, then it's not an opinion. It's insulting.

Like i really don't care about this sort of thing because i don't actively listen to it, it's just kind of a disservice and a watered down version of what is actually genuine.

If you've read my third post, which supports this quote, then maybe the whole "you're opinion man" wouldn't of been brought up.

Because it's very true, you have people who want to take something a culture and try to steal it and make it into something it's not. And they tend to do that with out any respect to tradition.

you're basic comments are "no i have the option to not respect what has been and what will be". Then that's the problem.

I've also said, in my third post, that you can do things like this because popular music of most genres can easily cross over with out much pain.

Country music now a days is most definitely pop and rap combined with twanged out telecasters and vocals, which is just dumb. It sound good but it's silly compared to what it could have been and what it has been.

I don't really care, because my roots are deeply involved with what i know is genuine and authentic folk music. I can't blame others for wanting that and not having it.

I suggest you don't feed me more than what you've already have given me...
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Arktopolis

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Re: Country/folk progressive house.
« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2016, 03:01:19 pm »
I find it hard to think how anyone would be insulted by the Avicii track. Rednex, yes, it's obvious, but that was a joke.

This kind of "bastardizing" has been done forever in music. Western composers like Mozart were influenced by oriental music and instruments, and included elements of them in the pop music of their time. To me, this tells that people are inspired by folk music, nothing more. Everything is a remix; being inspired by something doesn't take away value from that thing.

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Re: Country/folk progressive house.
« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2016, 06:34:37 pm »
I find it hard to think how anyone would be insulted by the Avicii track. Rednex, yes, it's obvious, but that was a joke.

This kind of "bastardizing" has been done forever in music. Western composers like Mozart were influenced by oriental music and instruments, and included elements of them in the pop music of their time. To me, this tells that people are inspired by folk music, nothing more. Everything is a remix; being inspired by something doesn't take away value from that thing.

I am not sure you carefully read the words that I wrote.

I understand the cross over of the popular country and the popular EDM and other POP related genres.

But, it's one thing to take something from another's culture and to disregard the respect it needs in order to utilize it in a tasteful way.

That's all i was saying.

But if we want to dig deep enough, the truth of the matter is that the roots of these kinds of music command a certain respect that many modern folks don't give.

I highly doubt mozart went on over to the orientals and just hardly listened before coming up with his version of their music.

Yea every thing is a remix, what ever. that's not my point.

It's the philosophy behind this that becomes convoluted cesspit of theft and unoriginal creation. It's not bad, but the actions that use this thought create something that shouldn't even be allowed to exist if you actually care or empathize with other people.

Like it's cool that people are experimenting, it's just kind of a touchy subject when you want to use other people's culture at their expense if you don't actually know how to be utilize those influences.

My prime example comes from an interview with dillon francis, getter, and nick coletti. Dillon Francis talks about his get low song with dj snake, and how that arabic reed instrument sound is actually influenced by dj snake's arabic heritage.

That's cool.

I think other people should discover their roots and be familiar with other people, but the key concept i am trying to drive home is respect. That's simply it.
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Joseph

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Re: Country/folk progressive house.
« Reply #11 on: March 03, 2016, 07:48:54 pm »
https://youtu.be/oQR7J-6Oh14?list=LL40ippYdMc1ZtZejEpTiJpQ

It's not meant for everyone

I get that, but it's not a good cross over. Maybe if you so happen to have a bias towards modern pop and country.

It's a little bastardizing to people who do real folk music from all around the world.

If you're not authentic in the pursuit then I think it's best to be left alone.

But what ever, people gonna people...


*edit* that mix tape browse through seems to be fairly tasteful.

but that's your opinion...
There are songs we think are good and songs we think are bad, crossover or not it doesn't really matter...

Not when you're involving other culture in which you have absolutely zero involvement with or knowledge about, then it's not an opinion. It's insulting.

Like i really don't care about this sort of thing because i don't actively listen to it, it's just kind of a disservice and a watered down version of what is actually genuine.

If you've read my third post, which supports this quote, then maybe the whole "you're opinion man" wouldn't of been brought up.

Because it's very true, you have people who want to take something a culture and try to steal it and make it into something it's not. And they tend to do that with out any respect to tradition.

you're basic comments are "no i have the option to not respect what has been and what will be". Then that's the problem.

I've also said, in my third post, that you can do things like this because popular music of most genres can easily cross over with out much pain.

Country music now a days is most definitely pop and rap combined with twanged out telecasters and vocals, which is just dumb. It sound good but it's silly compared to what it could have been and what it has been.

I don't really care, because my roots are deeply involved with what i know is genuine and authentic folk music. I can't blame others for wanting that and not having it.

I suggest you don't feed me more than what you've already have given me...

I'm starting to get a feeling that you're the type of person who doesn't like change, which I guess is all right, but probably not the best attitude to have when we are living in a period where change is a daily. Especially when electronic music is basically the definition of change. If you didn't have a stick shoved up your ass, you'd be able to appreciate the fact that people like country enough to try and bring it into the modern world. You even said it sounds good, but your mentality doesn't allow you to enjoy it. I honestly, don't see how this is disrespectful to your "culture", no one is saying "kill the hillbillies!" or "fuck country music", people are just making something new that they think sounds good. If you can't appreciate the fact that people like country enough to bring it up to date, then you're just going to be angry forever. I am not a fan of country music, but the stuff BURNT. makes is really good. Hate me for liking this "watered down" stuff, but it's good and nothing will change that.
"Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal."
-Picasso

"The reason we struggle with insecurity is because we compare our behind-the-scenes with everyone else’s highlight reel."
-Steve Furtick

Arktopolis

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Re: Country/folk progressive house.
« Reply #12 on: March 03, 2016, 07:51:01 pm »
I highly doubt mozart went on over to the orientals and just hardly listened before coming up with his version of their music.

From what I understand, "Alla turca" was the "Hey brother" of its day: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_music_(style)
Composers added Turkish-sounding percussion to their works because that was what people wanted to hear.

Like it's cool that people are experimenting, it's just kind of a touchy subject when you want to use other people's culture at their expense if you don't actually know how to be utilize those influences.

This is exactly what I hoped you'd explain! Why is it at their expense? What do the people from the US lose when Avicii decides to write a house-country tune?

Marrow Machines

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Re: Country/folk progressive house.
« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2016, 12:08:15 am »
I'm starting to get a feeling that you're the type of person who doesn't like change, which I guess is all right, but probably not the best attitude to have when we are living in a period where change is a daily. Especially when electronic music is basically the definition of change. If you didn't have a stick shoved up your ass, you'd be able to appreciate the fact that people like country enough to try and bring it into the modern world. You even said it sounds good, but your mentality doesn't allow you to enjoy it. I honestly, don't see how this is disrespectful to your "culture", no one is saying "kill the hillbillies!" or "fuck country music", people are just making something new that they think sounds good. If you can't appreciate the fact that people like country enough to bring it up to date, then you're just going to be angry forever. I am not a fan of country music, but the stuff BURNT. makes is really good. Hate me for liking this "watered down" stuff, but it's good and nothing will change that.

el oh el

you need to get better at interneting and reading beyond before you use words and have such a stuck up opinion. (watch that you'll make this the center of your next post)

I really don't care about the modern state of what is modern music, mostly because it just lacks character when you compare it to things from the past.

If you don't have any thing else to compare it against, then you have a bias against nothing so then how can you validate your own opinion? where's the rigor in your thinking process then?

The one thing i've noticed in my study of music and it's history is the down fall of musicianship, where the production has increased. Perhaps there's a correlation in that statement, but we'll leave that to the scientists and people who might find that research interesting.

You obviously seem pretty butt hurt about my opinions more than i seem angered.

Me not liking change has nothing to do with any thing. I am majoring in engineering, if i didn't like change or progress, i'd be fighting an uphill battle with the very concepts that people are trying to break on a daily basis to improve the world we live in....soooo don't even go there lol.

And your reasoning as to why i said the things i said are not even remotely close to an understanding of a tradition that you know of the self.

I rest my case, as you've basically ended the argument that you're trying to make by not knowing what else is out there. This conversation will eventually spiral  into misunderstanding and unkind comments if you decide to progress.

I highly doubt mozart went on over to the orientals and just hardly listened before coming up with his version of their music.

From what I understand, "Alla turca" was the "Hey brother" of its day: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_music_(style)
Composers added Turkish-sounding percussion to their works because that was what people wanted to hear.

Like it's cool that people are experimenting, it's just kind of a touchy subject when you want to use other people's culture at their expense if you don't actually know how to be utilize those influences.

This is exactly what I hoped you'd explain! Why is it at their expense? What do the people from the US lose when Avicii decides to write a house-country tune?

1) the time spent analyzing was the concept you've missed, and the message i wanted to take away. it has nothing to do with the flavors of what people may or may not wanted to hear. But the understanding of taste and application of that particular perspective in the music their audiences enjoy is what i was getting at. would you use a tool you knew nothing about? probably not, you'd use it at a more masterful capacity once you've learned and understood how it works and how it should and shouldn't be used.

2)I don't care what avicii and modern country does, that's not remotely close to what i am talking about. This is more about ancestral integrity and understanding what your very own roots are to create something interesting and cool. not to mention the respect you'd need to utilize a different perspective properly.


Once again, my first post was about the potential of abuse when it comes people's heritage. This about traditional folk music and the fusion of a modern context. Not popular music, you people can't seem to discern the difference between the two.
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Arktopolis

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Re: Country/folk progressive house.
« Reply #14 on: March 04, 2016, 05:32:31 am »
I thought this discussion was exactly about Avicii and his style.

Once again, my first post was about the potential of abuse when it comes people's heritage. This about traditional folk music and the fusion of a modern context. Not popular music, you people can't seem to discern the difference between the two.

Yet you still refuse to give an actual definition of what "abuse" is in this context.