Author Topic: Equalization Of Lead Layers  (Read 3308 times)

Lydian

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Equalization Of Lead Layers
« on: March 02, 2016, 02:55:06 am »
How do you guys generally equalize your lead layers? Do you keep your layers within the same frequency range or do you equalize them so that the layers exist in separate frequency ranges?
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FarleyCZ

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Re: Equalization Of Lead Layers
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2016, 07:52:31 am »
Dunno. I rarely layer stuff. ...but when I do, I treat each layer as a new instrument. I've never really understood why people beef up instruments in the same frequency ranges. Imho layers should complete each other by being as different as possible, not shout over themselves. I know bunch of guys will come in and say something about painting a new texture by combining two similar sounds and it's totally ok, but I tend to go the other way. :)
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vinceasot

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Re: Equalization Of Lead Layers
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2016, 10:23:58 am »
layering is first about picking the right sounds

then the sounds must all compliment each other nicely to form 1 in harmony

you need sounds to cover the high, mids and lows and then add more to your liking to add texture

when i first began like years ago.. i used to stack supersaw after supersaw but this is the incorrect way to layer

« Last Edit: March 02, 2016, 10:25:37 am by vinceasot »

FarleyCZ

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Re: Equalization Of Lead Layers
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2016, 05:21:29 pm »
when i first began like years ago.. i used to stack supersaw after supersaw but this is the incorrect way to layer
Exactly.
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Lydian

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Re: Equalization Of Lead Layers
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2016, 06:12:14 pm »
I get why stacking a supersaw after a supersaw wouldn't work as a layer. It's basically like taking a duplicate of a track and pasting it next to the original. You're just making the volume louder.

How about say strings over a saw playing the exact same notes with the strings in full stereo and the saw about halfway stereo?

I'm doing it right now and it sounds alright to my ears but I've never tried layering anything like this. I've always done my layering in this kind of approach.

Quote
cover the high, mids and lows
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Joseph

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Re: Equalization Of Lead Layers
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2016, 06:13:13 pm »
Depends on what you want to do, when I layer I generally try to have different sounds in different frequencies to make it pop more.
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RylanT

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Re: Equalization Of Lead Layers
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2016, 02:44:23 am »
I stack different sounding supersaws? Usually one layer is white noise and one layer is square
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vinceasot

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Re: Equalization Of Lead Layers
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2016, 10:04:22 am »
I stack different sounding supersaws? Usually one layer is white noise and one layer is square

having white noise as a layer for the lead is a must imo, it adds that extra

Unlogic Pro

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Re: Equalization Of Lead Layers
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2016, 04:12:49 pm »
Nice advices above.
All depend of sounds you put in Lead group, but here's tips I always do.
First of all I load Glue compressor on Lead group to connect them as one.
When I EQ my Lead group, I always cut lows (below 150hz), do little shelf to low something near 500hz. Then look at 4-7khz. I put down those freq a little because on stages these frequencies  stick out a lil bit. About highs there's options, because if you have white noise, there's no need a eq.  White noise gives all nice high freqs for leads.
After you can use C4 (for example) to control all these freq.
Some of your lead must be in center (not full center), and other can be a lil bit wider for make it huge :)
It's all depends on how you hear your leads and how you want them to hear. Your ears are the best judges to know that leads sounds okay :)

My process can be totally wrong, but I use this.

Sorry for English :)

ShawOfficial

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Re: Equalization Of Lead Layers
« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2016, 07:00:41 am »
What makes sounds pop out more are that they have their own defined frequency range.2 or more instruments having the same instruments doesn't make your mix muddy,cause in dance music,it's almost impossible to give each sound it's own specific frequencies,although it is possible to give it it's own specific frequency range.
Easiest way,choose a low lead layer,mid layer,and a high and probably a buzzy top lead.Layering the same sort of sounds playing the same notes and then putting a harsh eq on it would not only sound bad,the more you cut,will make it thinner to the ears.So choose layers wisely.
Eq layers separately,and together as a group as well.
Also a cool trick that I use,is after I've dealt with low and muddy frequencies(which I consider to be between 250 to 500Hz).
I use a multiband compressor to balance frequency content.
Also,if you're having trouble eqing correctly,look up for a PITCH FREQUENCY Chart and use them.
How I use the pitch frequency chart is,I put a low cut and enter a frequency value off the chart,depending on key of track,to the low cut.If I think I can cut more,I enter a higher value.If it happens to sound like I've cut too much,I bring the cut down to the last value in key and use shelf.Shelves are the most underrated tools in an eq.Unless you're using it to its extremes,the overall all sound will not be Changed too much,but when you listen to it with the other instruments playing,you'll definitely have made space for sounds in that frequency range.
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RylanT

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Re: Equalization Of Lead Layers
« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2016, 11:23:04 pm »
A mistake I used to make, was that when layering leads, I would go pick a low sound, a mid sound, and a high one, but I would cut them way too harshly, so instead of having a little bit of frequency overlap, I would end up with a lead sound that sounded like 3 different elements, rather than 1 lead. Having them overlap a little, and then adding compression after is what I found really helped me make a good lead.


I also find that finding one main sound for a lead is really important, make that one sound stand out, and then add whats missing onto it after. For example, adding some high end white noise on a separate layer, maybe another synth layered an octave below to make it thicker. But finding/creating a sound thats good to begin with really makes things a lot easier, then enhancing it with layers afterwards.

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