Author Topic: How do you define overproducing?  (Read 5979 times)

FarleyCZ

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How do you define overproducing?
« on: February 05, 2016, 07:42:39 pm »
With music that is based on some kind of instrumental or vocal performance, it's quite simple. It's overproduced when the performance is not the main thing anymore.
But the same question is much more interesting in electronic music world. That reference point is gone, so everyone has to invent their own. What's yours? :) How do you find out that you're trying too much?

I suppose the main answer will be: "It's overproducing when I'm hurting the song." ...but that's too vague. Where do you look exactly to evaluate this?

For me, It's usually when the feeling of the very first thing that "made the song" is starting the disappear. When that piece of melody or rythm that made me continue with the track is getting away. That's when I start to be a bit worried about overproducing the track. You?
« Last Edit: February 05, 2016, 08:04:32 pm by FarleyCZ »
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Bertie South

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Re: How do YOU define overproducing?
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2016, 08:06:54 pm »
Don't think I've ever encountered this. There have been times when I've fiddled with something more and more to make it work, when the problem was that what I started with just wasn't good in the first place, but that's not the same.


Do you have any examples of stuff that you think sounds overproduced?
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FarleyCZ

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Re: How do you define overproducing?
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2016, 08:20:28 pm »
That's actually the point. I don't. ...but it feels wrong. It feels wrong to just suppose there isn't such a thing in electronic music. When listening to some IDM stuff I sometimes think that some of the stuff they do is too complex for my taste, but probably wasn't for theirs.

Theoretically do you think there is a complexity level for a track where it would become evident that producer crossed some line?
"Earth is round right? Look at it from right angle and you'll be always on top of the world."
...but don't overdo it, because that's called being a d***k.

Cosmic Fugue

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Re: How do you define overproducing?
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2016, 10:32:12 pm »
Well, "overproduced" isn't something I say about electronic music much, but there are things like "Simply Being Loved" by BT where he was literally trying to break the record for most audio edits used in a song... the vocals are so glitched it's technically impressive but definitely loses some of the "hook" the vocals would have had.

For my own music, the thing I watch out for is if I'm working harder and harder to "fix" a track I don't like. It ends up overworked and muddy but the fundamental problem is still there. So I try to make sure I have some good melodies, chords, and sounds that work together before I start adding effects.
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cryophonik

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Re: How do you define overproducing?
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2016, 11:38:33 pm »
Yes, I think that this problem is all too common with beginning producers (and even some very experienced ones) who spend way too much time trying make their mix sound "pro", when the 7-minute song itself has nothing musically interesting in it to keep my attention for more than 20 seconds.  Songs that go nowhere, have no melody, and, hell, often not even a chord change, but, the mix actually sounds pretty good - I find this to be the case more often than not on production forums.  IMO, the primary purpose of the production part of music-making is to bring out the musical ideas, but too many people think that they can get away with skipping the hard part of creating great musical ideas simply by having a stellar production.  IOW, yes, you certainly can polish a musical turd, but it just leaves you with a shinier (overproduced) turd.
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FarleyCZ

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Re: How do you define overproducing?
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2016, 11:41:04 pm »
Yes, I think that this problem is all too common with beginning producers (and even some very experienced ones) who spend way too much time trying make their mix sound "pro", when the 7-minute song itself has nothing musically interesting in it to keep my attention for more than 20 seconds.  Songs that go nowhere, have no melody, and, hell, often not even a chord change, but, the mix actually sounds pretty good - I find this to be the case more often than not on production forums.  IMO, the primary purpose of the production part of music-making is to bring out the musical ideas, but too many people think that they can get away with skipping the hard part of creating great musical ideas simply by having a stellar production.  IOW, yes, you certainly can polish a musical turd, but it just leaves you with a shinier (overproduced) turd.
Agreed with every single word.
"Earth is round right? Look at it from right angle and you'll be always on top of the world."
...but don't overdo it, because that's called being a d***k.

manducator

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Re: How do you define overproducing?
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2016, 09:33:44 am »
Overproducing to me is changing things in your arrangement/mix/master that the average listenener would notice anyway. That's the time when your song is finished.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2016, 09:37:50 am by manducator »

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Re: How do you define overproducing?
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2016, 04:43:18 pm »
If you're trying to force a square peg into a round hole by using crappy samples or crappy sound design and slapping a ton of processing effects on top of it, you're probably overproducing.

If you're only adding effects to a sound to give it flavor and not because that sound or your song needs that effect, you're probably overproducing.

If you can remove an effect or a sound without your track feeling like it's empty or it's missing something, you're probably overproducing.

If you're just trying to make something good sound perfect instead of trying to make something bad sound good, you're probably overproducing.

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Re: How do you define overproducing?
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2016, 09:07:38 pm »
To me overproducing is when you don't release a song because you spend all of your time producing it and never deciding where to stop.
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Re: How do you define overproducing?
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2016, 12:37:32 am »
To me overproducing is when you don't release a song because you spend all of your time producing it and never deciding where to stop.
Eh, I just think it's where you release a song that has way too much in it at one time.
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Re: How do you define overproducing?
« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2016, 07:27:50 pm »
With music that is based on some kind of instrumental or vocal performance, it's quite simple. It's overproduced when the performance is not the main thing anymore.
But the same question is much more interesting in electronic music world. That reference point is gone, so everyone has to invent their own. What's yours? :) How do you find out that you're trying too much?

I'm actually not sure that it's so different in electronic music.  In vocal or instrumental music, that performance is the core of the song, and I think generally there's a similar "core" to any electronic production, be it the melody, the bass line, the groove, etc.  You're starting to overproduce in the same way when the things you add start to obfuscate the core of your song.  When there's so many details that your attention is dragged away from the core sound and it no longer stands out, you've done too much.

Cosmic Fugue

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Re: How do you define overproducing?
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2016, 12:12:49 pm »
Yeah, sometimes I catch myself thinking "I don't like this particular sound/melody/loop. I'll just turn the volume down on it and let it be a background thing."

If it doesn't add something GOOD to the track... it shouldn't be there.
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Re: How do you define overproducing?
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2016, 09:04:21 pm »
Overproducing for me is adding little elements/details to the track which the common listener wouldn't notice or add nothing to the track itself

Midge

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Re: How do you define overproducing?
« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2016, 01:41:45 pm »
overproducing for me is simply doing shit for the sake of it when it doesn't actually make your music sonically better.

A fine example of this is people not understanding how compressors work and just slapping compressors on sounds then assuming because its louder that it is sonically better.
Or another example is 'Eqing out' frequencies that aren't even present anyway. Little things like that are over producing if you ask me.

Every action you take when making music should in some way enhance the music you make. Processing should have a specific purpose.

FarleyCZ

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Re: How do you define overproducing?
« Reply #14 on: February 21, 2016, 08:39:32 pm »
^ This is a good one.
"Earth is round right? Look at it from right angle and you'll be always on top of the world."
...but don't overdo it, because that's called being a d***k.