Author Topic: Using chopped vocals to create a lead  (Read 1964 times)

basilthedog89

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Using chopped vocals to create a lead
« on: February 01, 2016, 03:17:02 am »
Anyone out there got some unique ideas on how to chop and process vocal samples to create interesting lead instruments?

I usually just slice a few pieces of a dry vocal and re-sample them to pitch them up or down. Lately I've been trying to reverse the vocal before doing slices to get more interesting sounds and thought you guys might have some different ideas?

Mussar

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Re: Using chopped vocals to create a lead
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2016, 03:21:59 am »
Looping things with Ableton's sampler is a nice classic (but I suppose not super unique). Lately I've been experimenting with using Serum's wavetable synthesizer and applying an envelope to the wavetable position - you can use bend modes and the various comb filters to get some crazy sounds!

dominique

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Re: Using chopped vocals to create a lead
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2016, 05:39:04 pm »
I love using the beatslicer in Guitar Rig and just messing around with the settings until it sounds cool

edit: oops i think i mistook your question for creating a melody with chopped/sliced vocals

charzrd

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Re: Using chopped vocals to create a lead
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2016, 07:08:45 pm »
Looping things with Ableton's sampler is a nice classic (but I suppose not super unique). Lately I've been experimenting with using Serum's wavetable synthesizer and applying an envelope to the wavetable position - you can use bend modes and the various comb filters to get some crazy sounds!

can you elaborate?

Mussar

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Re: Using chopped vocals to create a lead
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2016, 08:05:08 pm »
(I'm assuming you're talking about vocals in Serum.)

With a little bit of work, you can get short monophonic vocals into Serum's wavetable synthesizer. If you scan through the wavetable at a constant speed while playing a note, it will actually reproduce the the vocal sample. So by applying an envelope, LFO, or manual automation to the wavetable position you can get a lot of different articulations off the same vocal.

From there, you can apply warp modes like Bend +/- or Asymmetry, or some FM from oscillator B (try a sine wave an octave above or an octave below!), and either change the tonality of the vocal or start modulating those and turn your vocal into a gnarly bass growl.

Also for an easy Melbourne Bounce lead, take a long vowel sound from a vocal, consolidate it to a new sample, load it into Serum, make it monophonic and apply a lot of glide and distortion.

5of7

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Re: Using chopped vocals to create a lead
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2016, 10:34:05 pm »
If you're on fl you might want to simple load a track and pick some vocal bits that are sustained and throw it on the sampler. The thing is, when playing in higher or lower notes the sample speed might change it. A turnaround that i found is simple not going too high or low, adding reverb to disguise it a little and using several chops of different tonalities. Hope that helped.

basilthedog89

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Re: Using chopped vocals to create a lead
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2016, 11:48:19 pm »
With a little bit of work, you can get short monophonic vocals into Serum's wavetable synthesizer. If you scan through the wavetable at a constant speed while playing a note, it will actually reproduce the the vocal sample. So by applying an envelope, LFO, or manual automation to the wavetable position you can get a lot of different articulations off the same vocal.

I've been tossing up whether to buy Serum or not for a while but this probably made the decision for me - Sounds like a really cool way to make subtle (or not so subtle) changes to vocal samples.

SKEEV_IRWIN

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Re: Using chopped vocals to create a lead
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2016, 10:52:04 am »
With a little bit of work, you can get short monophonic vocals into Serum's wavetable synthesizer. If you scan through the wavetable at a constant speed while playing a note, it will actually reproduce the the vocal sample. So by applying an envelope, LFO, or manual automation to the wavetable position you can get a lot of different articulations off the same vocal.

I've been tossing up whether to buy Serum or not for a while but this probably made the decision for me - Sounds like a really cool way to make subtle (or not so subtle) changes to vocal samples.

Serum is so good for so many things, I sound like a rep for Xfer records but I legit use it for all my sounds, pads, plucks, leads, gnarly basses, weird FX, drums, you name it. So yeah I guess I'm trying to say Serum would be perfect for what you're trying to do, especially if you wanna be really unique and not just go the standard route of sampling.