Author Topic: The Do and Don't Encyclopedia  (Read 7243 times)

polymetric

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Re: The Do and Don't Encyclopedia
« Reply #30 on: January 06, 2016, 07:24:15 pm »
I got another one.

- Do break these do's/don't's when you have a good excuse to.
- Don't look for excuses to break them, it's probably only a good idea if you can come up with one immediately.

Syrant

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Re: The Do and Don't Encyclopedia
« Reply #31 on: January 07, 2016, 01:29:37 pm »
Do: Take other people's feedback and opinions into consideration.
Don't: Allow them to change YOUR music because they want it their way.

Example:
*Producer 1 sends WIP to a friend and asks for feedback.*
Producer friend: "I don't really like that bass/synth you have there" <- Wait a minute. He gave an opinion on what he thinks to your synth/bass in your track. Just because he doesn't like it, it doesn't mean that everyone else will also share that opinion. You have to take it with a grain of salt. If YOU feel that you're getting across the right
- Theme
- Emotion
- Style
of your track. Then stick with it.

Syrant

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Re: The Do and Don't Encyclopedia
« Reply #32 on: January 07, 2016, 01:31:22 pm »
Do: Awlays try to arrange the track as soon as possible. Why? Because while arraging, you will get new ideas on what to add.
Don't: end up working the whole night on the same 4 bar loop. U will get sick of your project sooner then you think.

I need this in my life.

Bizo

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Re: The Do and Don't Encyclopedia
« Reply #33 on: January 07, 2016, 01:32:49 pm »
Don't: Allow them to change YOUR music because they want it their way.

Example:
*Producer 1 sends WIP to a friend and asks for feedback.*
Producer friend: "I don't really like that bass/synth you have there" <- Wait a minute. He gave an opinion on what he thinks to your synth/bass in your track. Just because he doesn't like it, it doesn't mean that everyone else will also share that opinion. You have to take it with a grain of salt. If YOU feel that you're getting across the right
- Theme
- Emotion
- Style
of your track. Then stick with it.

^this

Syrant

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Re: The Do and Don't Encyclopedia
« Reply #34 on: January 07, 2016, 01:42:51 pm »
Someone mentioned something about learning your synthesisers and not getting all the cool new VSTs when you come to the conclusion that you have no idea how to use them.

This also applies to Audio plugins too:
Do/Don't: Forget about getting new compressors, reverb, Delay, *name an audio plugin here.* because your favourite producer uses it or to just "have it". When you have no clue on how to use it at all. Instead, you will be better off learning your DAW's native audio plugins. Take a compressor for example, don't go out and just get the Waves compressors when you don't even know how to use the compressor that comes with your DAW. Take the time to learn them ones first before upgrading to/or getting something that does pretty much the exact same thing.

TL;DR - Learn your daw's native plugins, tweaking every setting so you know EXACTLY what everything does, instead of wasting money on all the new stuff and not knowing how to use it.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2016, 01:44:43 pm by Syrant »

Syrant

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Re: The Do and Don't Encyclopedia
« Reply #35 on: January 07, 2016, 02:02:34 pm »
Here's another cool tip that would spark some incredible creativity in most producers.

Do: Try something out of your comfort zone. If you're an aspiring dubstep producer. It may benefit you to go out of your comfort zone and make something like House or Neuro/Glitch-hop or Mid-tempo tracks. You never know what you may come up with and so that's where the creativity really starts to shine. If you're having trouble with doing so, I would highly recommend you to listen to existing [house,neuro/glitch-hop/midtempo] tracks to get a feel for what you may like to make.

Who knows, maybe your next dubstep banger will have some influences from other existing genres ;)

Don't: Stick to one genre of music.

Scribit

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Re: The Do and Don't Encyclopedia
« Reply #36 on: January 07, 2016, 02:59:06 pm »

Don't: Stick to one genre of music.

Preach brother preach!

I could not agree with something or someone more.
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Steph S

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Re: The Do and Don't Encyclopedia
« Reply #37 on: January 07, 2016, 03:13:08 pm »
Do: reference good tracks when mixing/mastering.

Don't: get caught up in "highpass madness" -- you know what I'm talking about. The whole "highpass everything that isn't a kick, sub, or bass" craze. It can lead to a thin-sounding track. Try to stay away from this (unless there is something crazy going on in a certain channel's low end, then perhaps use a low shelving filter).
( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

producer_chick

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Re: The Do and Don't Encyclopedia
« Reply #38 on: January 07, 2016, 03:49:33 pm »
DO: Do keep your plugin collection manageable, too much stuff will just confuse you.

DON'T: Do not use any plugins unless you know all of their functions and what they're really for.

MatchstickMan

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Re: The Do and Don't Encyclopedia
« Reply #39 on: January 07, 2016, 04:12:06 pm »
Do: Go back to old projects to see if you spark any new ideas for current ones.
Don't: Let a few days of writers block make you throw away a project.

Do: Organize, organize organize.  Color code, label your tracks, set markers in the timeline.
Don't: Have unnecessary audio & MIDI tracks in your project - like old versions of synths, audio tracks with loops and samples you aren't using, etc. It makes so much clutter and harder to keep your mind focused wile trying to finish a track.

Do: Set deadlines for yourself - this ensures that you can do better if/when you get more into the industry (such as being on a record label or being a producer for a band).
Don't: Focus on one project at a time, have more projects to work on when you get writer's block on one project. Bounce around your project folder and find that old song that you never finished and see what you can do. This helps wonders.

(This one is more on the promotional side)
Do: Release some free songs now and then, if you do that, people will more than likely follow you and support you more, 'cause who doesn't like free music?
Don't: Focus so much on finding a record label to sign to. Take your time, develop your style, but when you have projects that are of high enough quality, go ahead and send them as demos, it never hurts, but remember, even if they don't take it, it's not the end of the world. Release that song fro free and you'll see how people take it.

Do: Find a balance in your life - don't let production drown out your life. I did this a while back and it actually hurt me mentally.  You need some time out of the studio, go out with friends, make friends, eat some actual food (I have this problem when producing - eating too much junk food). Take a walk, if you longboard, that also does wonders.  Basically, get out of the house for a little bit. make a habit of this so you don't end up being a studio potato.
Don't: Forget to produce! For many of us, composing and producing is our way to escape everyday life, so that's where the balance part comes in!

I'm done, hope all this was helpful, and if any of these were already stated, then i'm just reiterating them unintentionally.

Kabuki

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Re: The Do and Don't Encyclopedia
« Reply #40 on: January 07, 2016, 04:52:52 pm »
Do: Make time every day to produce. Even if it is a terrible session and you aren't feeling motivated, get in at least 1 hour a day. I guarantee your productivity will skyrocket.
Don't: Make excuses. "Oh, I had a long day at work." "Oh, I produced for a while yestereday." "Oh, I'm not really feeling it today." The more excuses you make, the less likely you are to actually do it. Get on that DAW, and get crackin'!

Do: Decide on your set of sounds. Come up with some patches you like and stick to them when you write. It will speed up your creative process immensely if you have a bank of your sounds that you can just drop into the track (instead of spending all of that time sound designing from scratch every time). Plus, then your releases will start to become more coherent, and soon enough, you'll find your sound!
Don't: Get too caught up in sound design or mixing. If the sound works, then keep it, even if how you made it was unorthodox. If you like the sound, don't change it!

Wontolla

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Re: The Do and Don't Encyclopedia
« Reply #41 on: January 07, 2016, 07:23:06 pm »
Do: remove the default limiter when you start a new FL project. For reasons beyond the comprehension of us mere mortals, there's a +5dB boost dialed in already, and that's probably the reason your track is always peaking.

Don't: use only compression and limiting, if you're trying to make your track as loud as possible. We can all hear that annoying pumping sound that comes from driving a limiter too hard, and we hate it (see above). Use soft saturation to get those extra couple decibels instead, but remember it's a type of distortion, so don't overdo it.